Can you claim your first aid course fee on your private health insurance?

Did you know that you may be able to make a private health insurance claim part for part, or all, of your first aid training course fee?

Depending on the fund, and the level of extras or packaged cover you have, your health insurer may pay for your first aid course. Check with your health insurer to see if this item is included.

Terms and conditions may apply. For example, the training must be nationally accredited, and must be provided by a government-accredited Registered Training Organisation (RTO). Your health insurer will be able to advise the full requirements.

It’s great to see that some health funds are recognising the importance of first aid training in your overall health management, and are acknowledging that a first aid course can contribute to the health maintenance of your family members.

If you are interested in obtaining a quote for group training, please email Fiona@thefirstaidlady.com.au or phone 0427 571 594.

Enjoy the beach but mind the stingers…

It’s great weather for enjoying the seashore on beaches across Australia, but the marine stingers think so too, particularly in Queensland.

The onshore northerlies on various beaches means blue-bottles aplenty. Some beachgoers have said it’s the worst summer they can remember for these stinging ocean dwellers, with a huge number of people reported being stung between 20 December and 10 January on beaches across.

The bluebottle – Physalia utriculus – is commonly referred to as a type jellyfish; however, it is not a ‘true’ jellyfish. Bluebottles float on the top of the water where they are blown by the wind. The poisonous tentacles hanging below the float are armed with stinging cells called nematocysts that inject venom into their prey (fish and other small marine life), and into unsuspecting swimmers.

For humans, the sting is painful but not deadly, and the pain starts to fade after about half an hour, especially if treatment begins promptly. However, children, asthmatics, and people with allergies can be badly affected, some experiencing respiratory distress.

The most effective treatment recommended these days is hot water. But first, remove the tentacles by picking them off with tweezers or gloved fingers, and rinsing the affected area with seawater. Then immerse the area in hot water. Ice can also be used to help with the pain. Rubbing with sand or applying vinegar are not recommended as they may aggravate the sting.

A rarer and more dangerous marine stinger is the Morbakka fenneri, a member of the Irukandji family. A sting from this creature can result in Irukandji syndrome. Symptoms include severe lower back pain, nausea and vomiting, difficulty breathing, profuse sweating, severe cramps and spasms, and a feeling of impending doom.

In this case, because the creature is classed as a tropical stinger, vinegar is the recommended treatment. Vinegar neutralises the discharge mechanism of the stinging cells, making them instantly and permanently unable to discharge any further venom.

First aid priorities are:

  •  Call 000 or the lifeguard
  • Apply CPR if necessary
  • Flood the sting area with vinegar
  • Seek further medical help if required

However, reports of stings are rare, and hospitals across the country are well-equipped to deal with victims of Irukandji syndrome.

To be safe in the sea, always swim between the flags, heed any warnings of the presence of marine stingers.

A range of first aid, workplace health and safety, and construction and industry courses are available from Allens Training’s extensive partner network of more than 500 qualified trainers across Australia.

If you would like to book into a course and learn the appropriate first aid response for treating stings, you should book into a first aid course.

If you are interested in obtaining a quote for group training, please email Fiona@thefirstaidlady.com.auor phone 0427 571 594. 

Four reasons you should update your first aid or CPR certificate

If it has been more than a year since you last completed first aid or CPR training you are likely due to renew at least the CPR component of your certificate.

Why should you keep your certificate current? Well, beyond various workplace and employment requirements, it is always good to refresh your first aid and CPR skills for a number of reasons.

I have forgotten what to do…

If, over the past 12 months, you haven’t had to use the skills you learned in you last first aid course, you may have forgotten some of what you learnt. It’s as simple as out of sight, out of mind.

As with most things, it’s always good to refresh your skills regularly, so when you need to use them you are confident to do so.

Things change…

As with all things, first aid treatments change over time. For example, over time the treatment for snake bites has changed, as has best practice CPR.

You could save someone you love…

I think we are all guilty of saying ‘I should do a first aid course one day’, but the reality is, unless we need to certificate for another reason such as work, we never actually attend a course.

Now is the time to stop procrastinating. Emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere. Whether you are grocery shopping at the local IGA, or at the park with your children, you could be required to perform CPR or first aid. Wouldn’t you want to know what to do?

You need it for work…

Does your workplace have a first aid officer? The First Aid in the Workplace Code of Practice recommends that first aiders should attend training on a regular basis to refresh their first aid knowledge and skills, and to confirm their competence to provide first aid.

Alternatively, you could be on the look-out for a new job, or about to complete a placement for your nursing degree at the University of the Newcastle (UoN).

Stop wasting time and act now.

If you haven’t done training in the last year, it is probably time to refresh your CPR skills. You can book into HLTAID001 Provide Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation to refresh your skills and renew the knowledge required to perform Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in line with the Australian Resuscitation Council Guidelines.

And how long has it been since you did a first aid course? Act now and book into your next HLTAID003 Provide First Aid course to learn all the necessary skills and knowledge required to provide first aid responses, life support, and management of casualties, the incident and other first aiders, until the arrival of medical or other assistance.

By refreshing your first aid training, you ensure your skills are up-to-date with the latest knowledge and treatments methods.

A range of first aid, workplace health and safety, and construction and industry courses are available from Allens Training’s extensive partner network of more than 500 qualified trainers across Australia.

If you would like to book into a course and learn the appropriate first aid response for treating stings, you should book into a first aid course.

If you are interested in obtaining a quote for group training, please email Fiona@thefirstaidlady.com.au or phone 0427 571 594.

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